PINNACLE® Hip System

Watch this video to
learn why surgeons and patients use the PINNACLE® Hip System.


Click here
 
 
Julie's Journey
PINNACLE® Hip Solutions' helped Julie's replacement feel more like a natural hip. View Video
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    Learn more about the PINNACLE Cup System and get help answering your patients' questions.
    For Healthcare Professionals

    PINNACLE® Cup System for Hip Replacement

    Introduced in 2000, the PINNACLE® Acetabular Cup System is one of the most widely used and clinically successful modular acetabular cup systems for hip replacement. In fact, the PINNACLE Cup System has been provided for more than one million patients.



    The PINNACLE Cup System has a strong track record of helping to reduce pain and restore mobility for patients suffering from chronic pain. With the PINNACLE Cup System, your surgeon has the flexibility to choose from among the most advanced technologies available depending on your individual needs.



    The PINNACLE Cup System has been cleared for sale by the FDA and regulators around the world, and is backed by more than a decade’s worth of clinical data that have shown that PINNACLE is a safe and effective option for patients who are candidates for hip replacement.

    About DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.
    DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc. was the first orthopaedic company in the United States and has been a leader in hip replacement for more than 40 years. Our mission is to develop products and technologies that help patients who have been affected by pain, disability and a loss of mobility return to their daily lives.

    Learn More about the History of DePuy Orthopaedics

     

    Track Record of Success
    Information from a variety of sources, including national joint registries, published literature, company-sponsored clinical trials and internal complaint data, has consistently demonstrated the PINNACLE Cup System is a safe and effective option for patients. Data from the most recent UK national joint registry annual report can be found here.

     

    Options to Meet the Needs of Patients
    The PINNACLE Cup System was designed and developed in consultation with experienced orthopaedic surgeons and leaders in the biomedical field. With the PINNACLE Cup System, your surgeon has the flexibility to choose from among the most advanced technologies available – ceramic-on-polyethylene, metal-on-polyethylene, or ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces – depending on your individual needs.1

    All hip replacements are designed to replace the ball-and-socket structure of your hip. Doctors call the ball portion of the ball-and-socket joint of your hip replacement a femoral head. The socket of your hip replacement is referred to as an acetabular cup or shell. The area where the moving parts of the implant connect is known as the bearing surface. The bearing surface gives the ball of the hip implant a smooth surface on which to glide and rotate. The term “bearing” actually refers not just to a single part of the implant, but also to the area at which the ball and socket rub together (like in a natural hip). The bearing is especially important because it affects:
    • Performance of the hip replacement
    • Mobility, flexibility, and range-of-motion of the joint
    • Durability of the hip replacement
    Surgeons choose the materials best suited for each patient.

             Healthy Hip                               PINNACLE Cup System

    The most commonly used total hip replacement bearing surface in the United States includes a metal femoral head with a polyethylene (plastic) liner that is seated within the acetabular cup or “shell.” The PINNACLE Cup System offers this option along with an additional range of bearing options that can be prescribed based on the individual needs of each patient.

    1 DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc. recently announced that as of August 31, 2013, it will discontinue its metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-metal options within the PINNACLE Cup System. For more information, please click here.

    Learn more about metal-on-metal implants
    Learn More About the Hip Replacement Procedure

    Important Safety Information
    The performance of a hip replacement depends on patient age, weight, activity level and other factors. As with all surgeries, there are potential risks, and recovery from hip replacement surgery takes time. People with conditions limiting rehabilitation should not have this surgery; only an orthopaedic surgeon can tell if hip replacement is right for you.

    It is important that you follow up with your surgeon if you are experiencing any symptoms for evaluation of your hip implant, as well as for routine check-ups on whatever schedule he or she recommends regardless of whether you are having symptoms.

     

     
     
     
    Watch this video to
    learn why surgeons and patients use the PINNACLE® Hip System.


    Click here
     
     
    Alvin's Journey
    PINNACLE® Hip Solutions kept this runner and former boxer active. View Video
  • More Patient Stories
  •  
    Learn more about the PINNACLE Cup System and get help answering your patients' questions.
    For Healthcare Professionals

    Innovating for Patients

    DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc. was the first orthopaedic company in the United States and has been a leader in hip replacement for more than 40 years. Throughout this time, DePuy has continued to innovate, constantly improving our products.

    Flexibility
    The PINNACLE Acetabular Cup System is a modular cup system that allows surgeons the flexibility to choose intraoperatively from among the most advanced technologies available – ceramic-on-polyethylene, metal-on-polyethylene, or ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces – depending on their patients’ individual needs.

    Important Safety Information
    The performance of a hip replacement depends on patient age, weight, activity level and other factors. As with all surgeries, there are potential risks, and recovery from hip replacement surgery takes time. People with conditions limiting rehabilitation should not have this surgery; only an orthopaedic surgeon can tell if hip replacement is right for you.

    It is important that you follow up with your surgeon if you are experiencing any symptoms for evaluation of your hip implant, as well as for routine check-ups on whatever schedule he or she recommends regardless of whether you are having symptoms.

     

     


     

     

     

     
     
     
    Watch this video to
    learn why surgeons and patients use the PINNACLE® Hip System.


    Click here
     
     
    Learn more about the PINNACLE Cup System and get help answering your patients' questions.
    For Healthcare Professionals

    Patient Stories

    For more than 10 years, the PINNACLE® Acetabular Cup System has been one of the most widely used and clinically successful modular acetabular cup systems for hip replacement.

    Read below to explore the stories of patients that now have reduced pain and restored mobility with their PINNACLE Cup System.

    Alvin's Journey

    Al had been active his whole life – he was a boxer in college and an enthusiastic runner for many years – so as the pain continued, he worried about his mobility.View Video

    Fredrick’s Journey

    PINNACLE® Hip System allows dad to play sports with his daughter.View Video

    Bonnie's Journey

    Hip replacement surgery using the PINNACLE Cup System from DePuy allowed this golfing and travel enthusiast to live her life the way she wanted to.View Video

     

    Julie's Journey

    Julie's PINNACLE hip replacement provides improved function and range of motion.View Video

     

     

     
     
     

     

    Watch this video to
    learn why surgeons and patients use the PINNACLE® Hip System.


    Click here
     
     
    Fredrick’s Journey
    PINNACLE® Hip System allows dad to play sports with his daughter

    View Video

  • More Patient Stories
  •  
    Learn more about the PINNACLE Cup System and get help answering your patients' questions.
    For Healthcare Professionals

    More Information on Metal-on-Metal Technology

    There are many different designs of hip implants and different materials used in the “ball” (femoral head), “socket” (acetabular cup) and liner components of an implant. In metal-on-metal hip implants, both the ball and the liner are made of metal (see picture below). Surgeons, in consultation with the patient, are able to choose from among the available options to select the best implant to meet the needs of the patient, whether it is a metal-on-metal implant or an implant made from a combination of other materials.

    Metal-on-metal hip implants have been available as an option for years and are made by a variety of manufacturers.

    The Performance of ULTAMET® Metal-on-Metal Articulation


    DePuy stands behind the clinical performance of the ULTAMET® metal-on-metal implant and is proud that it has helped reduce pain and restore mobility for patients suffering from chronic joint pain.

    DePuy continues to monitor current data about ULTAMET® metal-on-metal implants from a variety of sources, including published and unpublished data from national joint registries, published literature, company-sponsored clinical trials and internal complaint data. DePuy also continues to cooperate and share information with regulators.

    Through Use, All Implants Wear Over Time
    With an implanted hip, as with a natural hip, the “ball” rotates within the “socket” as the body moves, and when that happens, the two surfaces slide against each other. As the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stated, “all artificial hips require one component to slide against another component and it is inevitable that material at the surfaces will wear as they interact.”1 It is well documented that all hip implants, no matter what materials are used, experience wear over time and generate small particles called wear debris.

    To learn more, you can visit “Information for Patients Considering a Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant System” on the FDA web site by clicking here. 1

    It was the widely published concerns that wear debris from metal-on-polyethylene hip replacements used in the 1990s caused bone damage to a significant number of patients that re-kindled the orthopaedic community’s interest in developing a new generation of metal-on-metal implants. Though it is currently not possible to eliminate debris from being generated in a total hip replacement regardless of what bearing surface is chosen, laboratory testing has demonstrated that metal-on-metal bearings generate a lower volume of debris than either metal-on-polyethylene or ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings.

    Metal Ion Release
    Although there has been theoretical concern over metal ion release from metal-on-metal implants, no definitive data establishes that the level of metal ion release has clinical significance. In fact, the FDA has stated that “there are currently insufficient data to identify any specific metal ion levels that would cause adverse systemic effects.”

    The FDA is continuing to gather and review information about currently marketed metal-on-metal hip systems. The FDA has required manufacturers to submit a research protocol that addresses the performance and safety of metal-on-metal hip systems. Data from the studies conducted will enable the agency to better understand the performance of these devices and the associated risks. Other regulators, including the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), France’s Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Sante (AFSSAPS), and Health Canada have provided recent guidance on metal-on-metal hip implants.

    Important Safety Information
    The performance of a hip replacement depends on patient age, weight, activity level and other factors. As with all surgeries, there are potential risks, and recovery from hip replacement surgery takes time. People with conditions limiting rehabilitation should not have this surgery; only an orthopaedic surgeon can tell if hip replacement is right for you.

    It is important that you follow up with your surgeon if you are experiencing any symptoms for evaluation of your hip implant, as well as for routine check-ups on whatever schedule he or she recommends regardless of whether you are having symptoms.

     

    1“Information for Patients Considering a Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant System.” U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Accessed 10/4/2011. http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/Implantsa...

     
     

     

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